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2 edition of structure & development of the mosses & ferns (Archegoniatae) found in the catalog.

structure & development of the mosses & ferns (Archegoniatae)

Campbell, Douglas Houghton

structure & development of the mosses & ferns (Archegoniatae)

by Campbell, Douglas Houghton

  • 21 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Macmillan in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plant morphology,
  • Bryology.,
  • Ferns.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesMosses and ferns.
    Statementby Douglas Houghton Campbell.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK505 .C3 1895
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 544 p. :
    Number of Pages544
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18264378M

    The zygote (2n generation) is retained within the female sex organ of many of the mosses but is free-living in the ferns and their allies. The dominant generation in the mosses is usually the gametophyte, and in the ferns is the sporophyte. Alternation of generations in these groups is often quite complex.   Liverworts. Liverworts (Marchantiophyta) may be viewed as the plants most closely related to the ancestor that moved to land. Liverworts have colonized many habitats on Earth and diversified to more than 6, existing species (Figurea).Some gametophytes form lobate green structures, as seen in Figure shape is similar to the lobes of the liver and, .

    Pteridophytes (Ferns) In most ferns, the development of the leaf follows a. There is evidence that mosses with miniature foliage elements have extremely large leaf area index (LAI) values Author: George Yatskievych. Peat mosses grow submerged in the acidic waters of bogs, whereas various liverworts grow as epiphytes on the leaves of trees. Some mosses grow on rocks exposed to ocean salt spray or intense heat and sunlight. Others tolerate very dim light and grow in the understory of dense forests or inside caves and burrows (Fig. ). These adaptable plantsFile Size: 1MB.

    Lycophytes. Lycophytes, also known as the ‘fern allies’, are a clade of vascular plants similar to ferns but have unique leaves called microphylls. They are primitive plants and lack seeds, wood, fruit and flowers. As with the ferns, lycophytes produce spores for reproduction and are both wind-pollinated and dispersed. In seedless vascular plants, the sporophyte became the dominant phase of the life cycle. Water is still required as a medium of sperm transport during the fertilization of seedless vascular plants, and most favor a moist environment. Modern-day seedless tracheophytes include club mosses, horsetails, ferns, and whisk ferns.


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Structure & development of the mosses & ferns (Archegoniatae) by Campbell, Douglas Houghton Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Structure & Development of the Mosses & Ferns (Archegoniatae). Paperback – January 1, by Douglas Houghton Campbell (Author) See all 59 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Author: Douglas Houghton Campbell. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Campbell, Douglas Houghton, Structure and development of mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae).

New York, Macmillan Co. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Campbell, Douglas Houghton, Structure & development of the mosses & ferns (Archegoniatae).

London, New York, Macmillan, The structure and development of mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) By. Campbell, Douglas Houghton, Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info. New York,Macmillan, Edition [2d ed.] SubjectsBook Edition: [2D Ed.].

The Structure & Development of the Mosses and Ferns (Archegoniatae) [Campbell, Douglas Houghton ] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Structure & Development of the Mosses and Ferns (Archegoniatae)Cited by: Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Structure & Development of the Mosses & Ferns (Archegoniatae) by Douglas Houghton Campbell (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. The structure & development of the mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) The structure & development of the mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) by Campbell, Douglas Houghton, Publication date This book is available with additional data at Pages: The structure and development of mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) Pages; The structure and development of mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) By.

Campbell, Douglas Houghton, If you are generating a PDF of a journal article or book chapter, please feel free to enter the title and author information. He studied mosses and liverworts, producing The Structure and Development of Mosses and Ferns in This book, together with its subsequent editions in andbecame the authoritative work on the subject and "firmly established Campbell's reputation as one of the leading botanists of the United States."Alma mater: University of Michigan.

Full text of "The Structure & Development of the Mosses & Ferns (Archegoniatae)." See other formats. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

The structure & development of the mosses & ferns (Archegoniatae) by Campbell, Douglas Houghton,Macmillan edition,Cited by: The Structure and Development of the Mosses and Ferns.

By Douglas Houghton Campbell, Professor of Botany in the Leland Stanford Junior University. Other articles where The Structure and Development of Mosses and Ferns is discussed: Douglas Houghton Campbell: His best-known works are The Structure and Development of Mosses and Ferns (), which remained a standard college text for nearly half a century, and Evolution of the Land Plants (), which summarized his phylogenetic arguments.

- Identifier: structuredevelop00camp3 Title: The structure and development of mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) Year: (s) Authors: Campbell, Douglas Houghton, Subjects: Publisher: New York, Macmillan Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden Digitiz.

An elater is a cell (or structure attached to a cell) Mosses do not have elaters, but peristomes which change shape with changes in humidity or moisture to allow for a gradual release of spores.

Horsetail elaters. In The Structure and Development of Mosses and Ferns, (3rd ed.). New York: The Macmillan Company.

Fern - Fern - Sexual reproduction: The sex organs of ferns are of two types. The sperm-producing organ, the antheridium, consists of a jacket of sterile cells with sperm-producing cells inside.

Antheridia may be sunken (as in the families Ophioglossaceae and Marattiaceae) or protruding. They vary in size from those with hundreds of sperm to those with only 12 or so. seedless vascular--ferns, club mosses and horsetails. a rootlike structure in nonvascular plants that holds the plants in place and helps plants get water and nutrients.

Mosses have a 2 stage life cycle. Fertized egg grows into a sporophyte ferns and horse tails (notes said club mosses but this is book answer). Mosses and Ferns Among the first plants to live on Earth were the ancestors of the mosses and ferns you see today.

Both probably evolved from species of algae that lived in the sea and in freshwater. Mosses are simpler in structure than ferns. Mosses, and two closely related groups of plants known as liverworts and hornworts, are descended from File Size: 1MB.

Mosses are a phylum of non-vascular plants. They produce spores for reproduction instead of seeds and don’t grow flowers, wood or true roots. Instead of roots, all species of moss have rhizoids.

The mosses sit within a division of plants called the Bryophyta under the sub-division Musci. Mosses have spread all around the world and are found. Plants: 11 StudyJams.

Interactive Science Activities. These 11 science activities help students understand roots and stems, photosynthesis, gymnosperms, angiosperms, plants with seeds, plants without seeds, plant cells, plant adaptations, and more.

Ferns follow a pattern of development similar to that of mosses, although most (but not all) ferns are homosporous. That is, the sporophyte produces only one type of spore within a structure called the sporangium (Figure ).

One gametophyte can Author: Scott F Gilbert.The correct option (d) Ferns. The vascular system is more common in plants like ferns, pines, oaks, and corn.

These are seedless plants. Rather than seeds, these plants release spores for their reproduction. Hence, the option (d) is correct. Explanation for .Mosses have green, flat structures that resemble true leaves, which absorb water and nutrients; some mosses have small branches.

Mosses have traits that are adaptations to dry land, such as stomata present on the stems of the sporophyte. Mosses are anchored to the substrate by rhizoids, which originate from the base of the gametophyte.